kin of mumbai attack victims welcome

Relatives of victims of the 2008 Mumbai attack victims on Wednesday welcomed the execution of the lone surviving attacker, Ajmal Kasab, saying justice has been finally delivered. In Varanasi, Sunita Yadav, wife of victim Upendra Yadav, expressed her gratitude to the authorities for carrying out the execution.

Daily Bollywood News:Bipasha Basu - Bollywood will remain a hero-centric business

Women are active in show business like never before, but will they surpass the status Bollywood heroes enjoy? Never, says Bipasha Basu, who feels there is minimum opportunity for female actors in the Hindi film industry

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Saturday, November 14, 2009

AMD deal won't hurt Intel's business

Today's settlement of all antitrust litigation between Intel and Advanced Micro Devices should benefit both firms, and shouldn't hurt Intel's R&D operation, Intel CTO and senior fellow Justin Rattner told us today.

"As a legal matter, it only concerned a very small part of the company," Rattner said. "From an R&D perspective, there aren't really any changes as a result of the agreement. For the legal people at Intel, it's a big change but I don't think the rest of us will be terribly affected."

The deal, which settles both antitrust litigation and patent cross licence disputes, specifies that Intel will pay rival AMD $1.25 billion (£725m). Intel also agreed to abide by a set of business practice provisions.

For its part, AMD agreed to drop all pending litigation against Intel, including an upcoming case in the US and two cases pending in Japan. AMD also will withdraw all of its regulatory complaints filed against Intel with government agencies around the world.

"It's good for everyone that it's over," said Martin Reynolds, an analyst at Gartner. "These long term court battles are no good for anybody. This will make AMD a more attractive target for investors and it's certainly good news for Intel."

Reynolds said the settlement could portend that Intel will reach similar deals with other court foes.

The latest antitrust suit against Intel was filed last week by the state of New York, which alleges that Intel threatened computer makers, made payoffs and engaged in a "worldwide, systematic campaign of illegal conduct." An Intel spokesman downplayed that lawsuit, contending at the time it was a repackaging of the AMD case.

Therefore, Reynolds suggested, it's likely the AMD settlement will lead to the dropping of the New York lawsuit.

"With AMD withdrawing all complaints, it's likely all these suits will dry up," he added. "It will be hard to go forward."

The settlement should provide significant benefits to Intel over the long term, Reynolds said. "The $1.25 billion (£750m) is a downside, but that's about it. Intel can stand down in gathering all this evidence. They won't be in as many courtrooms. They can let go of some of their attorneys."

The settlement could also blunt any plans by the US Federal Trade Commission to jump into the antitrust fray against Intel, said Rob Enderle, an analyst with the Enderle Group. The FTC had launched an antitrust investigation into Intel more than a year ago and had been expected to take some kind of antitrust action against the firm soon.

"This means AMD will stop pushing on the FTC and states to pound on Intel. And Intel will be able to focus on business and not do brand damage control, discovery, [and the like]," Enderle said. "Like Microsoft discovered, this doesn't necessarily stop New York or the FTC but it removes a lot of the momentum behind those efforts and effectively lowers their priority."


Tags : business news headlines, world business news, financial business news, daily business news, current business news, business news today

The Need for Evidence-Based Medicine: Hospitals Are Searching for Point of Care Solutions

--(Business Wire)-- Zynx Health: WHO: Zynx Health, the leader in evidence-based and experienced-based clinical decision support, will showcase its solutions at the American MedicalInformatics ( News - Alert) Association's 2009 annual symposium in San Francisco. This is a pivotal time for facilities seeking to demonstrate the achievement of "meaningful use," a key criteria for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) reimbursement. Zynx Health supports organizations with clinical decision support solutions, including evidence-based order sets, clinical rules/alerts and interdisciplinary plans of care, at the point of care.

WHEN: November 14-18, 2009 WHERE: AMIA 2009 annual symposium; Booth 306, Hilton Hotel San Francisco, California WHY: Evidence-based medicine has become increasingly important in today's healthcare from the implementation of electronic health records (EHR) to increasing quality of care, to helping physicians remain current on best practices. Now, it is essential for ARRA reimbursement. By incorporating the Zynx Health portfolio of evidenced-based clinical decision support solutions into an EHR system, organizations will be best positioned to demonstrate the achievement of meaningful use.

"Since the inception of Zynx Health, it has been our mission to measurably improve the quality, safety and efficiency of patient care through the use of evidence-based clinical decision support," said Scott Weingarten, president and CEO of Zynx Health. "That mission is now strongly aligned with the Health Outcomes Policy Priority, which is to improve quality, safety and efficiency and reduce health disparities." CONTACT: Media interested in finding out more about this event should contact Carina Edwards, vice president of marketing and product management, 310-954-1950, cedwards@zynx.com or Lily Eng,Schwartz Communications ( News - Alert), 415-512-0770, zynx@schwartz-pr.com ABOUT ZYNX HEALTH Thousands of hospital organizations and providers trust Zynx Health order sets, plans of care, clinical decision rules, quality forecasters and practice guidelines to drive clinical improvements at the point of care. Drawing from vast client experience, the Zynx Health clinical service group shares proven best practices and supports the full implementation lifecycle. Delivered via paper, intranet or within an EHR, Zynx Health's suite of solutions integrates with an institution's infrastructure for use at the point of care.

Tags : business news headlines, world business news, financial business news, daily business news, current business news, business news today

China takes leading role in global recovery: Asia-Pacific business leaders

By He Liu and Wang Jingzhong

SINGAPORE, Nov. 14 (Xinhua) -- With its economy rebounding sharply in recent months as a result of the massive stimulus measures taken by the government, China is taking a leading role in the global recovery through a "balanced" contribution, said international business leaders at a summit in Singapore on the sidelines of the leaders meeting of the APEC.

STORING UP INVESTORS' CONFIDENCE

As the biggest event for the business community in the Asia-Pacific, the APEC CEO Summit this year saw over 1,000 of the world's top business leaders converging in Singapore to discuss ways to address the present economic crisis and fashion a stronger post-crisis financial and economic architecture, with the theme of "Rebuilding the Global Economy: Crisis and Opportunity".

As a global recovery from the financial crisis is in process, "China is taking a leading role," said Deb Henretta, Group President of Procter & Gamble Asia, in an exclusive interview with Xinhua during the CEO Summit.

She said the Chinese government has taken "early and fast" actions right after the economic crisis started to hit, which helped to set the stage and to lead the growth of the Asia-Pacific region.

Herman Ude, the CEO of DHL Global Forwarding, shared the same view with Henretta that China's stimulus package has helped store up investors' confidence in world economy.

"China plays an increasing role by providing the world with new products which come from Chinese companies," Ude said.

Besides, the increasing spending of Chinese consumers that encourages imports also gives some "relief" to other countries that had declined in their export.

"BALANCED " CONTRIBUTION

Given the fact that China's economy accounting for less than 8 percent of the world, experts said China's contribution to the world economy is not very big in terms of gross product, but the country is already making a significant contribution to the increment in the world's total gross product.

"With the role it has played in the global financial market, and with its domestic demand starting to pick up, China brings in a balanced contribution to the world going forward," Rahul Gupta, President & CEO of GE Money in Singapore and Malaysia, told Xinhua.

Robert Prieto, Senior Vice President of Fluor Corporation, specified what he believed to be the ways that China has driven impetus into the world economy.

"First, China has played an important role in stopping deterioration in the Chinese economy itself," he said.

What's more, China has dealt with "its immediateness effectively" by making investments and infrastructure in certain social safety nets that help further transform the Chinese economic position for the future.

Last but not least, "China is being a good regional and global partner" in tackling the financial crisis by working with other governments in stabilizing the global financial system and building up the confidence in the revival of the world economy, according to Prieto.

  GROWING IMPORTANCE AS SOURCE OF DEMAND

Along with a trend of outsourcing and trade chaining, China has seen an increase in export market share in recent years, which, as pointed out by Ricardo Charvel, member of the APEC Business Advisory Council, some economies have considered as a threat to their domestic industries.

However, Charvel argued that those people have failed to see the importance of China as a market for their products.

Under the influence of the economic stimulus measures taken since the financial crisis started to hit, China's domestic demand has strengthened and the economy has increased demand for imports.

"When China strengthens its internal market, it's crucial for the recovery for the economic growth worldwide," said Charvel.

Because of China's growing importance as a source of demand, and as a growingly important final market, the world will benefit from its economic growth, experts said.

"The stronger China's economy is, the better the regional and overall economy will perform," said Prieto of Fluor Corporation.

Tags : business news headlines, world business news, financial business news, daily business news, current business news, business news today

INTERVIEW - S.Korean builders struggle for commercial business

By Yoo Choonsik

SINGAPORE (Reuters) - Commercial opportunities remain depressed around the world although higher oil prices could help Korean builders find business in oil-producing countries, a medium-ranked South Korean contractor said on Saturday.

Ssangyong Engineering & Construction Co. Ltd. expected revenue to grow some 20 percent next year thanks to contracts awarded as part of stimulus spending in many countries, its chairman and CEO, Kim Suk-joon, said in an interview.

"We will post sales of slightly less than 2 trillion won ($1.73 billion) this year and our contracts awarded this year will amount to around 3 trillion won," Kim said.

That is up from 1.51 trillion won in sales posted last year by the company, among the top 10 contractors in South Korea. Some 60 percent of Ssangyong's revenue comes from overseas contracts.

"There's still a cold spell in the private sector," he said during the interview on top of a 200-metre-high building his firm is building in Singapore, part of the Marina Bay Sands Hotel.

"I am worried because public-sector contracts will begin declining next year whereas private-sector business is not fully back to normal."

The remarks echo concerns among policymakers in South Korea and other Asian countries that private demand remains weak despite talk of a global economic recovery, and that it is premature to unwind loose monetary and fiscal policies.

Kim said rising oil prices in recent months were allowing oil producing countries to resume spending on new construction projects, helping brighten the prospects for Ssangyong and other South Korean construction companies.

"Oil producing countries in the Middle East usually plan on new construction projects when oil prices rise above $40 to $45 (a barrel). Now the oil price is at around double that level and they have some room in government finances," he added.

"More than 80 percent of contracts South Korean companies win (abroad) are related to oil production."

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Imran Khans dad to be part of his engagement celebration



Imran Khan is looking forward to the arrival of one of the guests for his engagement ceremony celebration in January 2010. It is none other than his biological father, Anil Pal, who will be coming from the US to be with Imran for the celebration.

Imran is even happier because this is the first time his father will be part of any important event of Imrans life. Imran will be getting engaged to longtime girlfriend Avantika Malik in the third week of January.

Imran and Avantika got exchanged rings a few months ago in a close family ceremony but his father was absent then. So now that Imran is hosting a grand party, his father is one of the primary guests.

The young actor is very close to his father; having moved to California to live with him and studied there till his high school. His father visits Imran and his mother, Nuzhat, everytime he is in India. He shares a friendly relationship with Nuzhat and is waiting to be a part of his sons engagement. He likes Avantika a lot.

The news was confirmed by Imrans spokesperson.

Tags : Bollywood News India, Bollywood News Movies, Bollywood Television News, Bollywood Actress News, Bollywood Hot News, Current Bollywood News, Bollywood News Today, Bollywood News And Events, Latest News in Bollywood, Bollywood Celebrity News

Not as Saif's sister in his films: Soha Ali Khan



Soha Ali Khan says she doesn’t mind working in movies made under her brother Saif’s banner, but not as his sister.

“At the moment, there are no plans to work under Saif’s banner because he has just done ‘Love Aaj Kal’ and now he is working on ‘Agent Vinod’,” Soha told IANS in an interview.

“Most of the films Saif is planning at the moment will have him as the hero; so that doesn’t leave much space for me apart from being the sister of the hero, which is not very exciting.” she said.

“Unless he ventures out and makes something where he is not playing the hero, then maybe we will do something together. I would want that because I like his taste in films a lot,” she added.

Saif branched out into film production by launching his banner Illuminati Films and his maiden venture as producer was hit film “Love Aaj Kal”. Directed by Imtiaz Ali, it starred him along with Deepika Padukone.

Asked if she would be interested in venturing into production or direction, the 31-year-old said: “I might venture into production but not anytime soon. At the moment I feel that I’m very new and I love being in front of the camera and I want to continue acting. As far as direction is concerned, I don’t think I have the maturity for that at the moment. It’s only acting for me now.”

Soha, daughter of veteran actress Sharmila Tagore and cricketer Mansoor Ali Khan Pataudi, made her acting debut with “Dil Maange More” in 2004. She then received critical acclaim for her performances in films like “Rang De Basanti” (2006) and “Mumbai Meri Jaan” (2008).

In her recent release “Tum Mile”, which is set against the backdrop of the 2005 Mumbai floods, Soha is paired opposite Emraan Hashmi. Made under Mahesh and Mukesh Bhatt’s Vishesh Films, the film has been directed by Kunal Deshmukh.

Talking about “Tum Mile”, Soha said: “Shooting for the flood scenes in the film was a nightmare. I have become hydrophobic now. I don’t want to come anywhere close to water. It is actually painful to have a bath in the morning. All the memories come flooding back.”

Her future releases include “Life Goes On”, “Tera Kya Hoga Johnny” and “Accident”.

Tags : Soha Ali Khan, Saif, Sharmila Tagore, Mansoor Ali Khan Pataudi, Illuminati Films

Karisma Kapoor to reveal secrets of her past life in NDTV Imagine's TV show 'Raaz Pichhle Janam Ka'



Bollywood actress Karisma Kapoor will reveal the secrets of her past life' for NDTV Imagine's upcoming show 'Raaz Pichhle Janam Ka' , recently she shot for the show in which she was hypnotized and was asked questions about the secrets of her past life, reportedly Karisma was shocked by the revelations of her past life.

NDTV Imagine, a rapidly growing TV channel in India will air the reality show 'Raaz Pichhle Janam Ka'.

The contestants in this show will be hypnotized to speak out the secrets about their past lives. It will be a weekly show with 26 episodes.

The TV channel source say "Till now, there are only 26 episodes allotted for the show and Sushmita Sen is the first contestant of the show followed by Sanjay Dutt. Karisma Kapoor shot for the show yesterday and she was shocked with the revelations of her past life".

"Yes, the producers are putting in a huge amount and let me tell you, this show will become one of the best shows ever seen on television"

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Sampling a vibrant diaspora



New York-based photographer Preston Merchant on his pet project: visualising India's culture as seen through the diaspora.

Capturing Indian identity through the prism of Indian's new homelands. That is Preston Merchant's magnum opus. A New York-based freelance photographer, Merchant was enthralled by India at the outset of his career, and decided to look for its cultural progeny throughout the globe. He has been chronicling the Indian diaspora with his pictures for almost a decade now. His project, IndiaWorld, will culminate in a book, which he should complete in about a year. Excerpts from an interview:

What aroused your interest in the Indian diaspora?

I first went to India in 1996 and was drawn to the people and the culture. I went back several times in the following years. In 2002, I started photographing the Indian communities in New York and discovered that they are not all from India. There are large communities from Guyana and Trinidad, as well as families who have emigrated from East Africa, London, Singapore, Bangkok, and other places.

I managed to get some unrelated magazine assignments that took me several places with communities of Indian origin, and so the project took off. Initially, I did not have a personal connection to India, but I quickly developed one. One of my best friends Sam Daniel was a college professor in Kodaikanal at the time. I also am very close to the Ramaswamy family in New Jersey, who emigrated from Chennai. It has been fascinating to be with a family that moves easily between two worlds, maintaining and enjoying their traditional values while adapting them to different settings.

Also, I just got married. My wife was born in Delhi and came to the United States when she was 15. And I have dear friends all over India. So Indian culture for me is both global and personal.

Some favourite anecdotes behind the photos…

Lord Murugan Batu Caves: Some of the most significant Hindu structures outside South Asia are in Malaysia. The Batu Caves, near Kuala Lumpur, contain some remarkable temples from the 1860s inside a limestone cave complex at the top of a mountain. It's the site of the famous Thai Pusam festival. At the base of the caves stands a 43-metre gold statue of Lord Murugan, the largest in the world, built in 2006. I spent a day touring the caves in 2008 and wanted to photograph the statue at dusk when the spotlights were turned on. After several hours of waiting, the skies opened and a furious winter monsoon rain flooded the plaza. As evening fell and the rain tapered to a drizzle, I waded barefoot into the plaza with a length of cardboard over my head to keep the camera dry. I had waited about four hours for that moment and was initially upset about the rain. But the flooded plaza made a beautiful reflecting pool, gathering the light from the statue and brightening the whole scene. It was well worth the wait.

Dhow: In 2004, I spent three days with the crew of a small dhow docked in Sharjah in the United Arab Emirates. The nine-man crew were from Bet Dwarka in coastal Gujarat and were spending two weeks in the UAE, taking on sacks of millet and other grains for transport to Kuwait and Iraq.

The dhow functioned like a little floating Indian village. Only the captain spoke English, and I spoke no Gujarati and only a few words of Hindi. But we had a common interest in Bollywood, and I enjoyed the tea and rotis they served me. We were able communicate well enough, and I admired their courage as seafarers.

Despite the fact that the dhow had communications equipment and diesel generator, the crew's lifestyle had changed very little since traders began to ply the waters from the Arabian Peninsula to the west coast of the subcontinent thousands of years ago.

Barack Obama: In 2007, I photographed a private fundraiser for Barack Obama in New York in the very early stages of his presidential campaign. The group ‘South Asians for Obama' had worked hard to get his campaign to recognise the importance of the Indian American community. He was very well received and later appointed Indians and other South Asian Americans to his transition team after the election. Increasingly, Indian Americans are standing for elections at the local, state, and national levels. This is a relatively new phenomenon. I think it is very likely we will see an Indian American elected to the Senate or to the U.S. House of Representatives soon.

You must have come across peculiar examples of hybrid culture?

Each community in the diaspora has forged its own culture for reasons that have to do with isolation or necessity, or simple enjoyment.

The Indians in the Caribbean, for example, had very little cultural contact with India until fairly recently. Indian satellite channels and the Internet have made Indians in Guyana and Trinidad much more aware of their cultural history, which they embrace. Bollywood has always been popular, though it is no longer seen on cassettes smuggled from Bombay to Georgetown by a travelling businessman but on a 52-inch flat-screen television in people's living rooms.

Soca, the rhythmic dance music of Trinidad, has been given a subcontinental twist. “Chutney Soca” singers reinterpret the latest Bollywood hits, adding a calypso beat and a lilt to the Hindi vocals. Hindus in the Caribbean celebrate Phagwah, their version of Holi, which involves Johnson's Baby Powder and purple liquid. It has become a kind of national day for Indo-Caribbeans in New York, with a big parade in Queens. But the celebration is more about Guyana than India, since NRIs in New York have their own separate festivals.

Indians in South Africa, famously, created a dish called bunny chow, a loaf of white bread with a hole scooped out of the middle and filled with a potato or bean curry. There are different theories about its origin, but it seems to have been an adapted tiffin carrier. Every Indian diaspora community adapted local food and customs to their own, and the Indian communities in turn have influenced the local culture, especially in things like food and music. You can go to a South African restaurant in New York, for example, and enjoy a bunny chow without realising the dish was developed by Gujarati immigrants to Durban.

Culture in the diaspora is in a constant state of expansion, especially in the arts. There is a great Hindi-rock and Indo-jazz scene in New York, for example, along with the bhangra dancing that has been happening in clubs for a while.

Indian culture — modern, hip, and attractive — is an important part of global youth culture, and the forces driving it come from both the subcontinent and the diaspora.

When will you call your project finished?

So far I have photographed in 11 countries. I need to spend some more time in Britain and in California, and I want to photograph the large Sikh community in Vancouver. I do feel it is time to bring this project to a conclusion now. When IndiaWorld is finished, I might not have visited every community, but I will have sampled generously of the vibrant culture of the global Indian diaspora.

Tags : Books, Preston Merchant, visualising Indian culture, photographer, magnum opus

Famed Engineer O'Malley Dies at age 94

Thomas O'Malley, left, and John Glenn
Image above: Thomas O'Malley, left, posed with Mercury astronaut John Glenn before O'Malley helped launch Glenn aboard an Atlas rocket in 1962. O'Malley would play large roles in the Atlas, Apollo, Skylab and space shuttle launch operations during his legendary career in aerospace engineering. Photo credit: NASA
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Thomas O'Malley, a legendary engineer responsible for launching the first American into orbit, died of pneumonia Nov. 6 in Cocoa Beach, Fla., at age 94.

Working for General Dynamics' Convair division, O'Malley played major roles in the conversion of the Atlas missile into a rocket safe enough for the first astronauts.

O'Malley is perhaps best known as the man who pushed the button to launch the Atlas rocket that carried astronaut John Glenn into orbit on Feb. 20, 1962. That was the first time an American orbited the Earth.

Later, North American Aviation called on O'Malley to help get the company's Apollo command module launch operations back on track following the Apollo 1 fire that killed three astronauts in 1967. The redesigned command module made its first flight safely in October 1968.

O'Malley also was instrumental in launch operations for Skylab, Apollo-Soyuz and the space shuttle as a vice president at North American, which became Rockwell International.

O'Malley was born Oct. 15, 1915, in Montclair, N.J. He graduated from the Newark College of Engineering in 1936 with a bachelor's in mechanical engineering. His first aviation job came at the Wright Aeronautical Corporation.

He was married for 65 years to the former Anne Arneth and had two sons, Thomas Jr. and James; daughter Kathleen; three sisters, Winifred Dean, Eileen Lohr and Dorothy Ihde; three grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

NASA Technology Spinoffs Art Contest Winner Presentation at the Statue of Liberty

Ja Hyun (Ashely) Lim and Fred Gregory, former NASA Deputy Administrator and former shuttle astronaut
Ja Hyun "Ashely" Lim is pictured here with her award-winning painting, and Fred Gregory, former NASA Deputy Administrator and former shuttle astronaut. She won the "Goddard Celebrates 50 Years of Technology Spinoffs Art Contest" pictured. Credit: NASA
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The Statue of Liberty
The Statue of Liberty. Credit: NPS
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NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. is recognizing award-winning artwork honoring NASA Spinoff technology that was used to restore the Statue of Liberty National Monument, a unit of the National Park Service.

Students are recognizing NASA Goddard's 50th anniversary by reflecting on science, technology, engineering and the fine arts. NASA Goddard was opened in 1959.

NASA's Innovative Partnerships Program (IPP) Office sponsored "Goddard Celebrates 50 Years of Technology Spinoffs Art Contest" last winter. The purpose of the contest was to allow middle and high school students across the country to demonstrate through art, their knowledge of how NASA Goddard scientific technological achievements have made impacts on the quality of life. Some of the reference or source material the students were to use was the IPP Office annual publication, NASA Spinoff magazine, and the IPP Office website.

After receiving and reviewing contest submissions, Ja Hyun "Ashely" Lim was chosen as the winner. At the time of contest submission, she was a ninth grader at North County High School in Glen Burnie, Md. Lim’s eloquent rendering of a paint brush stroke from the Space Shuttle’s lift off pad launch gantries to the Statute of Liberty monument plainly demonstrates "movement" of NASA technology from one application of a technology to another external to NASA.

The connection between the Statue of Liberty and NASA is in a NASA Goddard-developed technology. When the Statue of Liberty was being restored in the early 1980s, the bars that help to support the copper skin of the Statue of Liberty were covered with a corrosion-resistant coating developed by NASA Goddard engineers. The coating is known as IC531, and is an aerospace Spinoff product manufactured by Inorganic Coatings, Inc. of Malvern, Penn.

IC531 was used as an interior structure primer coating for Miss Liberty. The coating was developed by NASA Goddard to protect gantries and other structures at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Fla. launch site.

The high-ratio silicate formulation in IC531 bonds to steel and in just 30 minutes and creates a very hard ceramic finish with superior adhesion and abrasion resistance.

Lim was honored at the NASA Goddard Celebrates 50 Years of Technology Spinoffs Event this past summer. In the spirit of cooperation, the NASA Goddard IPP will be presenting a framed copy of Lim’s artwork to the National Park Service at the Statue of Liberty on Nov. 13 at 9:30 a.m. EST at Ellis Island, N.Y.

Located on a 12-acre island, the statue of ‘Liberty Enlightening the World’ was a gift of friendship from the people of France to the people of the United States and is a universal symbol of freedom and democracy.


New Moon Sets Stage for Brilliant Leonids Meteor Shower

A Leonids meteor explodes in Earth's upper atmosphere in 1998.

A Leonids meteor explodes in Earth's upper atmosphere on Nov. 23, 1998. Image credit: Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) team.
Watch the meteor explode

This year's Leonids meteor shower peaks on Tuesday, Nov. 17. If forecasters are correct, the shower should produce a mild but pretty sprinkling of meteors over North America followed by a more intense outburst over Asia. The phase of the moon will be new -- setting the stage for what could be one of the best Leonid showers in years.

"We're predicting 20 to 30 meteors per hour over the Americas, and as many as 200 to 300 per hour over Asia," says Bill Cooke of the Meteoroid Environment Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. "Our forecast is in good accord with independent theoretical work by other astronomers."

Leonids are bits of debris from Comet Tempel-Tuttle. Every 33 years the comet visits the inner solar system and leaves a stream of dusty debris in its wake. Many of these streams have drifted across the November portion of Earth's orbit. Whenever our planet hits one, meteors appear to be flying out of the constellation Leo.

"We can predict when Earth will cross a debris stream with pretty good accuracy," says Cooke. "The intensity of the display is less certain, though, because we don't know how much debris is in each stream." Caveat observer!

Join the live chat with Bill Cooke on Monday, Nov. 16 from 3:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m, CST (4:00 p.m. until 5:00 p.m. EST). Bill will be online to take your questions about the Leonids meteor shower. To join the live chat, return to this page and log in by 3:00 p.m. CST (4:00 p.m. EST) on Monday, Nov. 16. The chat module will open below, embedded in this page. See you in chat!

Dawn Enters Asteroid Belt -- For Good

Artist's concept of Dawn
Artist's concept of Dawn. Image credit: NASA/JPL
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ASTEROID BELT -- NASA's Dawn spacecraft re-entered our solar system's asteroid belt today, Nov. 13, and this time it will stay there.

Dawn first entered the belt (whose lower boundary may be defined as the greatest distance Mars gets from the sun (249,230,000 kilometers, or 154,864,000 miles) in June 2008. It remained within the belt for 40 days before its carefully planned orbital path brought it below the asteroid belt's lower boundary.

This time around, Dawn's flight path will remain above this hypothetical lower boundary for the rest of the mission and for the foreseeable future - Dawn will become the first human-made object to take up permanent residence in the asteroid belt.

The mission of the 1,098-kilogram (2,421-pound) Dawn spacecraft is to reconnoiter Vesta and Ceres, the asteroid belt's two most massive inhabitants -- the asteroid Vesta and dwarf planet Ceres. The goal of this eight-year, 4.9-billion-kilometer (3-billion-mile) mission is to answer basic questions about the formation of planets in our solar system. NASA's unmanned Dawn spacecraft will be the first ever to orbit two planetary bodies on a single voyage. Dawn is 619 days away from arrival at its first celestial objective, asteroid Vesta.

For more information on Dawn please visit: http://dawn.jpl.nasa.gov/


Ghostly "Spokes" Puff Out From Saturn's Rings


Ghostly
Massive, bright clouds of tiny ice particles hover above the darkened rings of Saturn in an image captured by the Cassini spacecraft on Sept. 22, 2009, around the time of Saturn's equinox. Image credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
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Massive, bright clouds of tiny ice particles hover above the darkened rings of Saturn in an image captured by the Cassini spacecraft on Sept. 22, 2009, around the time of Saturn's equinox.

During this period, sunlight hits the rings edge-on and shines directly over the equator. The levitating icy particle clouds, which are known as "spokes" and are as wide as 10,000 kilometers (6,000 miles), appear particularly dramatic because of the unique lighting geometry of the equinox period.

The particles that make up spokes levitate above the ring plane when they acquire an electrostatic charge, the way static electricity on Earth can raise the hair on your arms. The spoke particles appear to acquire more charge during dim conditions and, during equinox, the bulk of the rings are in shadow. That angle of light also brightens features that stick out of the ring plane.

Saturn's exact equinox was Aug. 11, 2009, but there were extreme lighting conditions a few weeks before and after that date. Cassini's wide-angle camera captured this image six weeks later, when the spacecraft was about 1.3 million kilometers (808,000 miles) away from Saturn. The spokes appear in Saturn's B ring. Scientists are not yet sure how high these spokes hover above the ring plane. The bright dot on the left side of the image is Saturn's moon Janus.

Spokes in Saturn's rings were first discovered in the late 1980s by NASA's Voyager spacecraft. The features disappeared from view between 1998 and 2005, likely because of the angle of sunlight on the rings. To learn more about spokes, click here. A movie of spokes dancing around the rings in 2008 is available here.

Rosetta Completes Final Earth Flyby


View of Earth from the Rosetta spacecraft
Image of Earth acquired with Rosetta's narrow-angle camera from a distance of 633 000 kilometers (393,300 miles) on Nov. 12. Image credit: ESA
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PASADENA, Calif. - On its way to a 2014 rendezvous with comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft, with JPL instruments on board, flew past Earth today to pick up energy.

This is the third and final Earth flyby for Rosetta. It will provide exactly the boost Rosetta needs to continue into the outer solar system. The spacecraft is scheduled for a close encounter with asteroid 21 Lutetia in July 2010, before it goes into hibernation early in 2011, only to wake up in early 2014 for approach to 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

NASA has contributed an ultraviolet instrument (Alice); a plasma instrument (the Ion and Electron Sensor), and a microwave instrument (Microwave Instrument for the Rosetta Orbiter), among other contributions to this international mission. JPL manages NASA's participation in the Rosetta mission.

Learn more about NASA's contribution to Rosetta at: http://rosetta.jpl.nasa.gov


LCROSS Impact Data Indicates Water on Moon

The Visible camera image showing the ejecta plume at about 20 seconds after impact.

The visible camera image showing the ejecta plume at about 20 seconds after impact.
Credit: NASA


Data from the down-looking NIR spectrometer.

Data from the down-looking near-infrared spectrometer. The red curve shows how the spectra would look for a "grey" or "colorless" warm (230 C) dust cloud. The yellow areas indicate the water absorption bands.
Credit: NASA


Data from the Ultraviolet/Visible spectrometer taken shortly after impact.

Data from the ultraviolet/visible spectrometer taken shortly after impact showing emission lines (indicated by arrows). These emission lines are diagnostic of compounds in the vapor/debris cloud.
Credit: NASA

The argument that the moon is a dry, desolate place no longer holds water.

Secrets the moon has been holding, for perhaps billions of years, are now being revealed to the delight of scientists and space enthusiasts alike.

NASA today opened a new chapter in our understanding of the moon. Preliminary data from the Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite, or LCROSS, indicates that the mission successfully uncovered water during the Oct. 9, 2009 impacts into the permanently shadowed region of Cabeus cater near the moon’s south pole.

The impact created by the LCROSS Centaur upper stage rocket created a two-part plume of material from the bottom of the crater. The first part was a high angle plume of vapor and fine dust and the second a lower angle ejecta curtain of heavier material. This material has not seen sunlight in billions of years.

"We're unlocking the mysteries of our nearest neighbor and by extension the solar system. It turns out the moon harbors many secrets, and LCROSS has added a new layer to our understanding," said Michael Wargo, chief lunar scientist at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

Scientists have long speculated about the source of vast quantities of hydrogen that have been observed at the lunar poles. The LCROSS findings are shedding new light on the question of water, which could be more widespread and in greater quantity than previously suspected.

Permanently shadowed regions could hold a key to the history and evolution of the solar system, much as an ice core sample taken on Earth reveals ancient data. In addition, water, and other compounds represent potential resources that could sustain future lunar exploration.

Since the impacts, the LCROSS science team has been working almost nonstop analyzing the huge amount of data the spacecraft collected. The team concentrated on data from the satellite's spectrometers, which provide the most definitive information about the presence of water. A spectrometer examines light emitted or absorbed by materials that helps identify their composition.

"We are ecstatic," said Anthony Colaprete, LCROSS project scientist and principal investigator at NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif. "Multiple lines of evidence show water was present in both the high angle vapor plume and the ejecta curtain created by the LCROSS Centaur impact. The concentration and distribution of water and other substances requires further analysis, but it is safe to say Cabeus holds water."

The team took the known near infrared spectral signatures of water and other materials and compared them to the spectra collected by the LCROSS near infrared spectrometer of the impact.

"We were only able to match the spectra from LCROSS data when we inserted the spectra for water," said Colaprete. "No other reasonable combination of other compounds that we tried matched the observations. The possibility of contamination from the Centaur also was ruled out."

Additional confirmation came from an emission in the ultraviolet spectrum that was attributed to hydroxyl, one product from the break-up of water by sunlight. When atoms and molecules are excited, they release energy at specific wavelengths that are detected by the spectrometers. A similar process is used in neon signs. When electrified, a specific gas will produce a distinct color. The ultraviolet visible spectrometer detected hydroxyl signatures just after impact that are consistent with a water vapor cloud in sunlight.

Data from the other LCROSS instruments are being analyzed for additional clues about the state and distribution of the material at the impact site. The LCROSS science team along with colleagues are poring over the data to understand the entire impact event, from flash to crater, with the final goal being the understanding of the distribution of materials, and in particular volatiles, within the soil at the impact site.

"The full understanding of the LCROSS data may take some time. The data is that rich," said Colaprete. "Along with the water in Cabeus, there are hints of other intriguing substances. The permanently shadowed regions of the moon are truly cold traps, collecting and preserving material over billions of years."

LCROSS was launched June 18, 2009 as a companion mission to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. After separating from LRO, the LCROSS spacecraft held onto the spent Centaur upper stage rocket of the launch vehicle, executed a lunar swingby and entered into a series of long looping orbits around the Earth.

After traveling approximately 113 days and nearly 5.6 million miles (9 million km), the Centaur and LCROSS separated on final approach to the moon. Traveling as fast as a speeding bullet, the Centaur impacted the lunar surface shortly after 4:31 a.m. PDT Oct. 9 with LCROSS watching with its onboard instruments. Approximately four minutes of data was collected before the LCROSS itself impacted the lunar surface.

Working closely with scientists from LRO and other observatories that viewed the impact, the LCROSS team is working to understand the full scope of the LCROSS data. LRO continues to make passes over the impact site to give the LCROSS team additional insight into the mechanics of the impact and its resulting craters.

What other secrets will the moon reveal? The analysis continues!

Earhart's Scarf to Fly Again


The STS-129 mission patch
The mission patch for the STS-129 mission reflects elements of shuttle Atlantis' payload and its place in larger goals of space exploration. This patch, attached to the launch-and-entry suit of Commander Charles O. Hobaugh, is one of the hundreds of mission patches being carried into space on the flight. Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett

A scarf belonging to famed aviatrix Amelia Earhart will circle the Earth repeatedly as part of the personal cargo being carried into space by the astronauts of space shuttle Atlantis’ STS-129 mission.

Albert Bresnick was a personal photographer to Earhart, and now, astronaut Randy Bresnick is rekindling the family connection. The Marine aviator and first-time space flier received the white, green and red scarf from the 99s Museum of Women Pilots in Oklahoma City, an organization of female pilots that formed with the help of Earhart. Randy Bresnick is also bringing along a photo from the Amelia Earhart Birthplace Museum in Atchison, Kan.

In 1932, Earhart became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean, becoming in the process a prominent and celebrated adventurer. She, along with her navigator, disappeared over the Pacific Ocean five years later while trying to become the first woman to circumnavigate the globe in an airplane.

The remaining crew members of STS-129 have chosen a wide assortment of medals, shirts, patches and even a thumb drive to commemorate their 11-day venture to the International Space Station.

A cycling jersey from Lance Armstrong's LiveStrong Foundation will travel on the flight, completing the distance in seven minutes that Armstrong and the cyclists in the peloton rode in three weeks during the Tour de France.

Veteran astronaut Charles O. Hobaugh, also a Marine pilot, commands the mission that will deliver a pair of racks loaded with equipment to the station.

First-time shuttle Pilot Barry E. Wilmore has seen to it that Tennessee Technical University is well-represented in the commemorative assortment known as the Official Flight Kit. The school, which Wilmore graduated from with a master's in electrical engineering, will see a thumb drive, purple and gold placard, gold medallion, and a stuffed-toy eagle make the trip into space aboard space shuttle Atlantis.

The toy eagle will be joined by a stuffed-toy blue spider from the University of Richmond, the alma mater of veteran Mission Specialist Leland Melvin. A football jersey from Melvin's Heritage High School days also will make the trip. Melvin was drafted in 1986 by the NFL's Detroit Lions and took part in training camps with the Dallas Cowboys and Canadian Football League's Toronto Argonauts.

MikeForeman, an experienced spacewalker from the STS-123 mission, is marking his hometown of Wadsworth, Ohio, with patches from the city's police and fire departments.

Harvard Medical School and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology are symbolically carried into space in the form of a flag from Harvard and a copy of MIT's charter. First-time flier and physician Robert L. Satcher Jr. graduated from both schools during his educational career.

When the shuttle returns to Earth to end the STS-129 mission, the personal commemoratives will be removed and returned to the astronauts. Typically, the items are then returned to their sponsoring institutions or presented as gifts by the astronauts as a way to inspire future explorers.

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The View From Space: Two New Experiments Take Fresh Looks at Earth's Coast, Atmosphere

HICO image of Midway Island
HICO image taken over Midway Island on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2009. Image Credit: NASA
They've only been on orbit a couple of months, but two new sensors examining our upper atmosphere and oceans already are demonstrating the International Space Station's value as an Earth science observing platform.

The experiments -- the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean, or HICO, and the Remote Atmospheric and Ionospheric Detection System, or RAIDS -- work in tandem as the HICO and RAIDS Experiment Payload, or HREP. The joint payload is operated by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory in Washington and its partners.

HICO is the first hyperspectral sensor specifically designed to investigate the coastal ocean and nearby land regions from space. Its imaging shows unique characteristics across the electromagnetic spectrum, including those ranges not visible to the human eye, such as ultraviolet and infrared light.

HICO image of South China Sea near Hong Kong

HICO image taken over a coastal region of the South China Sea near Hong Kong, China, on Friday, Oct. 2, 2009. Image Credit: NASA


RAIDS, built jointly by the Naval Research Laboratory and The Aerospace Corporation in El Segundo, Calif., is a hyperspectral sensor suite used to study the Earth's thermosphere and ionosphere -- layers of the atmosphere where the space shuttle and space station orbit. Its eight optical instruments measure the chemistry, composition and temperature of the thermosphere and ionosphere. It also is testing new techniques for remotely sensing these atmospheric regions, which are very difficult to measure, yet very important for understanding the behavior of low-altitude satellites, space junk and sub-orbital rocket systems.

"The instruments take advantage of the space station as a host platform for Earth observation," said Julie Robinson, International Space Station program scientist at the Johnson Space Center in Houston. "The space station was designed to host numerous instruments for looking at Earth and space, providing attachments sites, power and data."

A portrait of the refurbished RAIDS scan head and IR detector box, left, before experiment integration.

A portrait of the refurbished RAIDS scan head and IR detector box (left) before experiment integration. Image Credit: NASA
The paired HREP experiments launched to the space station in September aboard the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's H-II Transfer Vehicle -- an unmanned cargo ship for station resupply. HICO and RAIDS are also the first U.S. remote sensing instruments to be mounted on the space station and the first to be installed on the Japanese Experiment Module's Exposed Facility -- a multipurpose platform where science experiments can be deployed and operated in open space.

"The HICO experiment completed checkout in October, and already has acquired many high-quality hyperspectral images of land and coastal scenes," said Mike Corson, principal investigator for HICO at the Naval Research Laboratory. HICO is serving as a pathfinder for technologies and environmental product algorithms to be used for future free-flying instruments, but will in addition provide an immediate return of hyperspectral image data that can be analyzed.

RAIDS viewing geometry from International Space Station

This graphic shows the RAIDS viewing geometry. RAIDS views aft (anti-RAM) as the ISS orbits viewing the atmospheric limb by scanning near the horizon. Image Credit: NASA
The RAIDS experiment checkout, also completed in October, gathered atmospheric observations using all eight of its sensors. "RAIDS has collected sufficient data to satisfy its secondary science objective -- measuring the low-altitude source of daytime radiation in the ionosphere," said Scott Budzien, principal investigator for RAIDS at the Naval Research Laboratory. "RAIDS began science operations on Oct. 23, and is now focused on collecting data to address the primary science objective, which is to measure temperature and its variability in the thermosphere."

The experiments are operated and managed from the Payload Operations Center at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. in cooperation with the Naval Research Laboratory. The HREP payload was sponsored by the Office of Naval Research. Payload integration and launch to the space station were provided by the U.S. Department of Defense Space Test Program.

For more information visit:



New Russian Module “Poisk” Docks to Station

Russian Mini-Research Module 2

Image above: The Russian Mini-Research Module 2, also known as Poisk, is seen shortly after docking to the International Space Station. Credit: NASA TV

The new Russian Mini-Research Module 2, also known as Poisk, docked to the space-facing port of the Zvezda service module of the International Space Station on Thursday, Nov. 12 at 10:41 a.m. EST. It began its trip to the station when it was launched aboard a Soyuz rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Nov. 10.

Poisk is a Russian term that translates to search, seek and explore. It will provide an additional docking port for visiting Russian spacecraft and will serve as an extra airlock for spacewalkers wearing Russian Orlan spacesuits.

Poisk joined a Russian Progress resupply vehicle and two Russian Soyuz spacecraft docked at the station.


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NASA's LCROSS Impacts Confirm Water in Lunar Crater

MOFFETT FIELD, Calif. -- Preliminary data from NASA's Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite, or LCROSS, indicates the mission successfully uncovered water in a permanently shadowed lunar crater. The discovery opens a new chapter in our understanding of the moon.

The LCROSS spacecraft and a companion rocket stage made twin impacts in the Cabeus crater Oct. 9 that created a plume of material from the bottom of a crater that has not seen sunlight in billions of years. The plume traveled at a high angle beyond the rim of Cabeus and into sunlight, while an additional curtain of debris was ejected more laterally.

"We're unlocking the mysteries of our nearest neighbor and, by extension, the solar system," said Michael Wargo, chief lunar scientist at NASA Headquarters in Washington. "The moon harbors many secrets, and LCROSS has added a new layer to our understanding."

Scientists long have speculated about the source of significant quantities of hydrogen that have been observed at the lunar poles. The LCROSS findings are shedding new light on the question with the discovery of water, which could be more widespread and in greater quantity than previously suspected. If the water that was formed or deposited is billions of years old, these polar cold traps could hold a key to the history and evolution of the solar system, much as an ice core sample taken on Earth reveals ancient data. In addition, water and other compounds represent potential resources that could sustain future lunar exploration.

Since the impacts, the LCROSS science team has been analyzing the huge amount of data the spacecraft collected. The team concentrated on data from the satellite's spectrometers, which provide the most definitive information about the presence of water. A spectrometer helps identify the composition of materials by examining light they emit or absorb.

"We are ecstatic," said Anthony Colaprete, LCROSS project scientist and principal investigator at NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif. "Multiple lines of evidence show water was present in both the high angle vapor plume and the ejecta curtain created by the LCROSS Centaur impact. The concentration and distribution of water and other substances requires further analysis, but it is safe to say Cabeus holds water."

The team took the known near-infrared spectral signatures of water and other materials and compared them to the impact spectra the LCROSS near infrared spectrometer collected.

"We were able to match the spectra from LCROSS data only when we inserted the spectra for water," Colaprete said. "No other reasonable combination of other compounds that we tried matched the observations. The possibility of contamination from the Centaur also was ruled out."

Additional confirmation came from an emission in the ultraviolet spectrum that was attributed to hydroxyl, one product from the break-up of water by sunlight. When atoms and molecules are excited, they release energy at specific wavelengths that can be detected by the spectrometers. A similar process is used in neon signs. When electrified, a specific gas will produce a distinct color. Just after impact, the LCROSS ultraviolet visible spectrometer detected hydroxyl signatures that are consistent with a water vapor cloud in sunlight.

Data from the other LCROSS instruments are being analyzed for additional clues about the state and distribution of the material at the impact site. The LCROSS science team and colleagues are poring over the data to understand the entire impact event, from flash to crater. The goal is to understand the distribution of all materials within the soil at the impact site.

"The full understanding of the LCROSS data may take some time. The data is that rich," Colaprete said. "Along with the water in Cabeus, there are hints of other intriguing substances. The permanently shadowed regions of the moon are truly cold traps, collecting and preserving material over billions of years."

LCROSS was launched June 18 from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida as a companion mission to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO. Moving at a speed of more than 1.5 miles per second, the spent upper stage of its launch vehicle hit the lunar surface shortly after 4:31 a.m. PDT Oct. 9, creating an impact that instruments aboard LCROSS observed for approximately four minutes. LCROSS then impacted the surface at approximately 4:36 a.m.

LRO observed the impact and continues to pass over the site to give the LCROSS team additional insight into the mechanics of the impact and its resulting craters. The LCROSS science team is working closely with scientists from LRO and other observatories that viewed the impact to analyze and understand the full scope of the LCROSS data.

For information about LCROSS, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/lcross

Tags : News in Nasa, current nasa news, nasa daily news, nasa news today

Friday, November 13, 2009

Sachin makes time stand still



In a sport that specialises in the manufacture of instant stars and transient celebrities, Tendulkar is the real thing. Even now, twenty years
after his debut, there's always a sense of occasion every time he comes to the crease, no matter the game, no matter the place

Many tributes to Sachin Tendulkar. This month will begin with a recollection of one of his epic innings. I wish to cite one of the shortest. It was in Melbourne, my hometown, on Boxing Day 2003. It was a day rich in entertainment, containing a Virender Sehwag century full of eye-popping strokes. Seldom, however, have I sat in a crowd so obviously awaiting one player, and when Tendulkar appeared they radiated happiness and contentment, bursting into heartfelt applause. Tendulkar at the MCG? Delayed Christmas presents come no better.

Except that it was all wrapping and no gift. Tendulkar feathered his first ball down the leg side, and was caught at the wicket — a miserable way to fall for any batsman, in addition to being a lousy anti-climax . The crowd had hardly ceased cheering than it was compelled to resume, cheering Tendulkar off, and the feeling afterwards was almost devastation. You could hear the sibilance of conversations, as connoisseurs ruminated that cricket sure was a funny game, and fathers tried explaining to sons that even the greats had bad days. About three overs later, three spectators at the end of my row got up and left. It was mid-afternoon , Sehwag was still mid-spectacular , and they left. This was not what they had come for, and they would accept no substitute. I had to stay — it was my job — but I could easily have followed them. The hollow feeling persisted all day.

When it comes to communicating Tendulkar's place in cricket history to future generations, I suspect, this is what will be most significant, and also the hardest to convey. In the twenty years of his career, international cricket has changed unrecognisably: elaborate and ceremonial Test cricket has been usurped, economically at least, by the slick, shiny celebrity vehicle of Twenty20.

Yet even now, Tendulkar makes time stand still: every time he comes to the wicket, no matter the game, no matter the place, there is a sense of occasion. It needs no pop music, no cheerleaders, no word from his many sponsors. He is announced by his accumulated excellence, the effect somehow magnified by his tininess: little man, big bat, great moment. His entry could not seem more dramatic if he was borne to the crease on a bejewelled palanquin by dusky maidens amid a flourish of imperial trumpets.

This, moreover, has been the case almost for longer than one can remember. I first saw Tendulkar bat live in England in 1990. He looked so young, so small, like a novelty item on a key chain. Any sense of frailty, however, was quickly dispelled; instead, there was a sureness of touch, not just impressive but altogether ominous. You told yourself to remember him this way; you wanted to be able to say you were there; he was going to be good, so good. By the time he first toured Australia eighteen months later, he simply oozed command. All that held him back, and it would be a theme of his career, especially abroad, was his sorely outclassed team.

Sometimes, this looked almost eerie. Ten years ago in Melbourne, India and Tendulkar played a Test at the MCG. To distinguish between the two was only fair. India were terrible, a shambles. Kumble dropped the simplest catch imaginable from the game's second ball and took 2-150 ; Dravid batted more than three and a half hours in the match for 23 runs; Laxman and Ganguly failed twice, the latter playing on to Greg Blewett, of all people.

Tendulkar batted as if on a different pitch, to different bowlers in a different match. Shane Warne came on in front of his home crowd with Australia in the ascendant. Tendulkar promptly hit him into that crowd beyond mid-off . Brett Lee, in his debut Test, bowled like the wind. Tendulkar treated him as a pleasant, cooling breeze. The follow-on loomed, apparently unavoidable. Tendulkar guided India past it, toying with Steve Waugh's formations, making the fielders look as immobile and ineffectual as croquet hoops.

Had it not been for his ten teammates, Tendulkar could have batted until the crack of doom. As it is, he had to rest content with 116 out of an otherwise bedraggled 238. And this wasn't just an innings; it was, at the time, a synechdoche of Indian cricket. No matter where he went, Tendulkar was the main event, preceded by acute anticipation, followed by grateful wonder, seasoned with sympathy, that such a flyweight figure had to bear such burdens.

There is no discussing Tendulkar, even in cricket terms, as batsman alone. He is also, of course, Indian cricket's original super celebrity; as Pope wrote of Cromwell, ‘damn'd to everlasting fame' . In this sense, he has been preternaturally modern, at the forefront of developments in the culture of stardom in his country, with his telephone-number television entanglements and sponsorship deals, and his reclusive private life. Without Tendulkar's prior demonstration of cricket's commercial leverage, Lalit Modi and all his works would have been unthinkable.

What's truly amazing, nonetheless, is that the simulacrum of Tendulkar has never overwhelmed the substance. He has gone on doing what he does best, and has done better than anybody else in his generation, which is bat and bat and bat. Like Warne, albeit for different reasons, cricket grounds have been a haven for him: in the middle, he always knows what to do, and feels confident he can do it. Life is full of complications and ambiguities; cricket by comparison, even shouldering the expectations of a billion people, is sublimely simple.

Tendulkar's fame, then, is of an unusual kind. He is a symbol of change, but also of continuity. What's astonishing about his batting is not how much it has changed but how little. He set himself a standard of excellence, of consistency, of dominance, and challenged the rest of Indian cricket to meet him up there. Gradually, in the 21st century, albeit not without setbacks, stumbles, financial excesses and political wranglings, it has. His presence now is an ennobling one. First it was his excellence that rubbed off; now it is his integrity. Cricket today specialises in the manufacture of instant stars, temporary celebrities, glorious nobodies. Tendulkar acts as a kind of fixed price or gold standard. To choose a well-loved and well-worn advertising catchline, he is ‘the real thing' .

In his sheer constancy, in fact, Tendulkar unwittingly obscures just how completely cricket has been transformed, to the extent that it is almost impossible to imagine his fame being replicated. Who in future will play international cricket for twenty years, losing neither motivation nor mastery? Who in future will master all three forms of the game, capable of spontaneous spectacle and massive entrenchment alike? Who in future will excite us simply by walking onto the field, just a man and a bat, and disappoint so seldom? Recalling how shocked, even grief stricken, was that crowd in Melbourne six years ago as Tendulkar's back was swallowed by the shadows of the pavilion, I find myself brooding anxiously on the thought of what it will be like when he disappears for the last time.

154

That's how many one-day wickets Sachin has claimed with his gentle leg-breaks . Nehru Stadium in Kochi has been his happy hunting ground, with both his fivers coming there — 5 for 32 against Australia in 1998, and 5 for 50 against Pakistan in 2005. The Pakistani giant Inzamam-ul Haq was an unlikely Sachin bunny, falling to him seven times

44

Test wickets have been fewer with 3-10 against South Africa at Mumbai in 2000 being his best.

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Thursday, November 12, 2009

There should be a limit to fun, says angry Katrina Kaif



Bollywood actress Katrina Kaif is not taking rumours of her marriage with an Indore-based politician lightly. She says people should have fun, but within limits.

"The police have already issued a statement saying that it is utter rubbish and the police are going to arrest him and serve notice. I hope they do. I agree doing it in fun is one thing but there should be a limit," Katrina told reporters here.

"People shouldn't cross the line. I will definitely support the police' decision to penalise the person," she added.

The news came in effect after a marriage certificate approved by the Indore Municipal Corporation came to surface. It claimed that the 24-year-old is married to local Bharatiya Janata Party member Ramesh Mendola since December 2, 2008.

The certificate was also registered with the Indore civic body December 11 that year. The local Municipal Corporation however retaliated that the certificate was fake and a complaint will be lodged with the police.

The actress was in the capital to launch Veet's Ready-To-Use Wax Strips. Katrina is the brand ambassador of the brand.

Katrina, who starred in recently released hit Ajab Prem Ki Ghajab Kahani, also insisted: "I'm confident enough to know what I am speaking."

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Om Puri apologises to his wife, son



Veteran Bollywood actor Om Puri is in remorse for blasting his wife Nandita through the media a couple of days ago for exposing his past sexual encounters. He had said that he would not forgive his wife for revealing his bitter past to market her biography Unlikely Hero: The Story Of Om Puri, on him. Now, he has offered apology to her and his son Ishaan for the pain he has caused.

Om said that he had said things that he shouldn't have said out of anger. He regretted his impulsive nature and thus hurting his wife and son in the process. He said that Nandita has been bombarded with calls, messages and visitors inquiring about what he had said but he's not in the town to protect them. He added that his wife is feeling miserable and his son was crying over the phone. He has apologised to them for being so rash.

The actor, who is currently busy shooting for a film in Chandigarh, said that he couldn't concentrate on his work. He said that he should have targeted the publishers for leaking only his sexual experiences for publicity instead of blasting his wife. He added that he would beg his wife and son for forgiveness.

Nandita revealed a couple of days ago that her husband had sex with his maid Shanti at the age of 14 and has a liaison with a woman named Laxmi. Reacting to the revelation, Om said that he would not forgive his wife for exposing his bitter past.

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Gang looted vehicles Bollywood style, busted in Rajpura

In a case of Bollywood films inspiring youths to take to crime, the Patiala police arrested a group of youths from Chandigarh and parts of Punjab, who took to looting and extortion after being inspired by popular flick Oye Lucky Lucky Oye.

According to Patiala Zone IG Paramjit Singh Gill, the Rajpura police on Wednesday busted the gang and recovered a large number of cars looted by them, besides arms and cash. The gang had kept the police of Punjab, Haryana, Himachal Pardesh and Chandigarh on its toes for long. Investigation is on and it is expected that more clues in the case would be found, he added.

Patiala SSP RS Khatra said four teams were formed by the Rajpura police to nab the gang from a checkpost in Jansua village on the Chandigarh-Patiala highway. The police recovered 14 cars, three pistols, one air gun, one knife, 32 mobile phones, five laptops and 20 alloy wheels from them.

The arrested are Irbanpreet Singh alias Pinki, Amit Sharma and Amandeep Singh —- all residents of Zirakpur, Lucky Singh of Sector 21-D, Chandigarh and Barjodh Singh of village Raipur Fabba in Nawanshahr.

The accused confessed that they used to sell car accessories to Rajwan Khan, a resident of Chhatbir, and Krishan, a resident of Nangla near Zirakpur. They were also arrested later. Another accused Vicky Plumber, a Zirakpur resident, managed to escape and a hunt is on to arrest him.

According to the police, they used to follow the method shown in Oye Lucky Lucky Oye to snatch and steal vehicles.

They then changed the number plates of stolen vehicles and sold them. They also used to take out costly accessories like music systems from vehicles and sold these.

They would also give lifts to travellers and snatch their mobile phones, laptops and cash at gunpoint.

Among other vehicles, they had stolen one Honda City (CH-03 S-4431) from Sector 44, Chandigarh, One Zen (CH-01 T-0911) from Sector 47 and one Esteem (CH-01B-4950). In the first week of November, they stole an Alto on Rajpura Sirhind Road near Basantpura and mobile phones and Rs 40,000 from three persons travelling in the car.

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20 years on, Tendulkar takes fresh guard



Sachin Tendulkar begins a third decade in world cricket next week, insisting he is still as passionate to play for India as he was as a wide-eyed teenager 20 years ago.

"My love for cricket and the honour of playing for my country have kept me motivated all these years," said Tendulkar, 36, ahead of the first Test against Sri Lanka starting in Ahmedabad on Monday.

"Cricket is my life and I am lucky and absolutely honoured that I have been able to wear the India cap for 20 years."

The Ahmedabad match will be Tendulkar's 160th Test appearance -- surpassed only by retired former Australian captain Steve Waugh's tally of 168 -- since his debut aged 16 against Pakistan in Karachi on November 15, 1989.



He has risen to become the world's most successful batsman in both Test and one-day cricket, a result of both his unparalled genius with the bat and amazing longevity in the game.

The world was a different place when Tendulkar began. No one sent e-mails or browsed the world wide web, Nelson Mandela was still in jail, the Soviet Union had not broken up and mobile phones had not become a way of life. When he started, Tendulkar's current captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni was an eight-year-old schoolboy and team-mates Ravindra Jadeja and Virat Kohli were barely a few months old.

"We call him 'grandpa' in the dressing room," joked compatriot Yuvraj Singh. "But he is just amazing. He has achieved everything there is to achieve, but still wants to improve with every game.



"Frankly, I can't think of an Indian team without Tendulkar."

Among post-war cricketers whose careers spanned 20 years were Pakistanis Imran Khan and Mushtaq Mohammad, West Indian Garfield Sobers, Colin Cowdrey of England and Bobby Simpson of Australia.

But Tendulkar has scaled the summit, scoring more Test runs (12,773) and centuries (42), and more one-day runs (17,178) and hundreds (45) than any other batsman.

And he is not done yet. One of his cherished dreams is to win the World Cup in front of millions of worshipping home fans when India co-hosts the 2011 showpiece with Sri Lanka and Bangladesh.

Tendulkar has appeared in five World Cups and helped India reach the final in South Africa in 2003, but Sourav Ganguly's men failed to emulate Kapil Dev's winning feat in England in 1983. Tendulkar, born in a middle-class family of a Marathi novelist and named after famous Bollywood music director Sachin Dev Burman, is a multi-millionaire in a country where he is revered like a demi-god.

But retirement has not even crossed his mind despite the wear and tear of a 20-year grind that has left him nursing injuries to the shoulder, elbow, back, hamstring and feet.

"I know there is lot of cricket left in me because I am still enjoying it," said Tendulkar. "I am not thinking of retirement. At some stage, I will have to, but I don't need to think of it right now."

Team-mates and rivals alike rejoice at his feats. Australian spin legend Shane Warne rated Tendulkar as number one on his list of 50 contemporary cricketers prepared for the London-based Times newspaper.

Former captain Ganguly calls him "the king of cricket", West Indian great Viv Richards, one of Tendulkar's childhood heroes, regards him as "99.5 percent perfect."

Sri Lankan captain Kumar Sangakkara says the Indian is the "greatest modern cricketer."

For his countless fans, Tendulkar is a joy to behold. For there may never be another like him again.

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