kin of mumbai attack victims welcome

Relatives of victims of the 2008 Mumbai attack victims on Wednesday welcomed the execution of the lone surviving attacker, Ajmal Kasab, saying justice has been finally delivered. In Varanasi, Sunita Yadav, wife of victim Upendra Yadav, expressed her gratitude to the authorities for carrying out the execution.

Daily Bollywood News:Bipasha Basu - Bollywood will remain a hero-centric business

Women are active in show business like never before, but will they surpass the status Bollywood heroes enjoy? Never, says Bipasha Basu, who feels there is minimum opportunity for female actors in the Hindi film industry

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Tuesday, February 17, 2009

The story of the economic recovery package (photos)

As President Obama says, the economic recovery package is just one of three "legs of the stool" -- a milestone, but an early one, the very beginning of the long process of fixing the economic crisis we inherited.

Tomorrow we'll mark the end of that beginning, as President Obama travels to Denver, CO to sign the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act that the House and Senate approved last Friday.

Over the past few weeks, the President spent some time with Americans across the country who are hurting because of this crisis. And the team has been working around the clock, meeting with House members, Senators, and governors -- Democratic and Republican alike -- to build and pass the recovery package.

Along the way, White House photographer Pete Souza, whose job it is to visually document everything the President does, has captured some pretty incredible behind-the-scenes images. It’s a glimpse of the President and of the White House that you don’t usually get to see.

Flip through the photo gallery below -- then take a look at the finished product and offer your thoughts.

Sudden Cardiac Death Rare in Young Athletes


Risk is similar to that of being killed by lightning, study finds.

The rate of young athletes in the United States dying of sudden cardiac failure is relatively rare, on par with the same age group being involved in a lightning-related death, researchers say.

According to a study published in the journal Circulation, 1,866 U.A. athletes, ages 8 to 39, died suddenly or survived cardiac arrest from 1980 to 2006.

Cardiovascular disease killed more than half those athletes, with one in three being linked to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a condition that results in an enlarged heart that can often be detected by a routine electrocardiogram (ECG).

While ECGs are used regularly in pre-screening athletes in Europe, particular in Italy, debate has been ongoing as to whether the United States should call for more rigorous and broad health screening of athletes. The American Heart Association recommends deeper examination only if a first-line physical and family history raises questions or issues.

"Indeed, the relatively low absolute number of cardiovascular sudden death events reported here in young athletes raises some doubt regarding the ambitious considerations for pre-participation screening based on the rigorous Italian model," lead author Dr. Barry Maron, director of the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Center at the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, Minn., said in the published report.

An average of 66 athlete deaths were caused by cardiovascular disease in the last six years in the study period, with the most in a year being 76. Maron said the cardiovascular issued probably wouldn't have been identified in about 30 percent of those cases even if with ECGs and other strict screening.

Of the other cardiac deaths in young U.S. athletes, 22 percent (416) resulted from blunt trauma that structurally damaged the person's heart. Commotio cordis, a blow to the chest that interrupts the heart's beating, caused another 4 percent (65), while heat stroke caused 2 percent (46).

"The low overall event rate reported here should provide a general measure of reassurance regarding sports participation," Maron said in the report.